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00:30:00

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Us 7, Randy Campbell 4, Arizona 4, Facebook 3, San Francisco 3, Jennifer 2, At&t 2, Rebecca Delgado 2, The City 2, Lisa Mc Kenzie 1, Jeff Nicole 1, Mike Yeager 1, Jennifer Nelson 1, Rick Stanton 1, Rick 1, Phoenix 1, Viola 1, Abate Graffiti 1, Clearchannel 1, Graffiti Vandal 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    April 20, 2013
    8:44 - 9:14pm PDT  

8:44pm
l >> janna lord couldn't be here today to accept it. she had a family crisis. but this is for clearchannel outdoor for helping the conference. by the way, when those ads went up we were averaging 1300 hits a day on the website. (applause) >> another person who couldn't attend the award today, monica rose is our graphic artist who does a lot of work for us and she won the contest for designing the logo for the conference. pretty nice design, i think. so, monica rose will be receiving an award for the designing of the logo. she designed the programs and she designed the brochures to promote the conference. and she's already said that she's on board donating it for the 2013 conference in phoenix. (applause) >> >> rick stanton nominated
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somebody. rick? * >> if you've been working in graffiti profession for awhile, i think everybody knows randy campbell. who knows randy campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries
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and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a network where you can do that. so, you send that in to him, he sends it out and it goes to hundreds of cities. if you're looking for somebody and you think that other cities might know who that is, put that out and he'll send it out to all those cities. so, e-mail him and get on his network. he's got a website. and he's a great resource for law enforcement specifically and everybody else, too, but law enforcement specifically to help you find graffiti vandals or to add on to cases if you do find a graffiti vandal. so, this is for randy campbell. thanks. (applause) >> good news. rebecca delgado is in the house. rebecca, would you like to come up and say a few words about your group at the academy of arts?
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>> hello, everybody. thank you very, very much. first of all, i would like to say my name is rebecca delgado and i'm a board member of the graffiti advisory as well as a volunteer for dpw. i've been a volunteer with dpw for about 10 years and a board member for about sick years. and i am actually here to nominate -- oh, before i say that, i wanted to thank all of you, by the way, for being here today for joining the conference. i'd like to thank all the people, all the organizations responsible for putting together the international conference. and thank you for visiting our city. i hope you had a great time while you're here and you will continue to explore the city this weekend. you are very lucky because we
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have a great, great weather. it was winter not too long ago. i think the last 24 hours, and today it's borderline between spring and summer. so, you guys lucked out on the weather. i nominated the academy university because of its commitment, long-time commitment and dedication to the beautification of san francisco. they, too, have been involved as a partner with dpw going on 10 years. they have supported the community clean team. the students and faculty come every month in large numbers to plant trees, pick up litter on the streets, and abate graffiti. and in addition to that, the academy adopted 16 city blocks in the city whereby our cap a sigma fraternity go out there
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every other weekend to abate graffiti. * and i was hoping that they were supposed to be here, but i told them to be here at 4:15 to accept their award. but they're not here yet and that's too bad because i wanted you guys to meet them because they are a bunch of great, great young men who really cares for the city. they're not doing it to get paid. they're not getting paid, by the way, they're not getting an extra grade for doing it. they do it because these are the new crop of young generation who cares. they love their city. they love their government. and they want to give back to our city, to give back to our country. so, hooray for them and thank you for coming. (applause) >> caitlin young.
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>> i didn't think i planned to talk. i'm caitlin young and i'm from omaha, nebraska. we nominated our senior painter, jeff nicole. he was with the city program 15 years ago, he basically ran it since it started. he ran it for 10 years by himself all over our city. and, so, just through all that he's never changed his dedication. he doesn't take shortcuts, repaint and color match and do all public and private property in our city. so, just his dedication in our program has made a huge difference in our city. we appreciate it. (applause)
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[laughter] >> congratulations. (applause) >> lisa mc kenzie. >> okay.
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i'm accepting this award for mike yeager and bill mcdonnis, [speaker not understood]. i think all the cities that have volunteer programs it's usually a handful of volunteers that do a majority of the work. these guys are both retired and they have accomplished so much within their neighborhood. they live in one of the biggest neighborhood associations -- excuse me, homeowner associations in san antonio, about 5,000 houses. so, he wrote his little speech so i'm going to read his speech. he would like to thank the stop urban blight organization on our behalf for recognizing this and bill and i are truly do not do what we do for recognition, but is very gratifying when someone takes the time and effort to tell you and the public at large that they appreciate your efforts and think you have made a difference that is worthwhile. i feel especially grateful that a national organization would do this for me. thank you on behalf of mike and bill. (applause)
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>> all right. last but not least, my personal favorite. jennifer nelson began working with me four years ago and through some downturns in the economy ended up having to leave and take a different job, was making pretty darn good money. and a year ago december jennifer approached me and said, i hate my job. she says, but i loved the nonprofit. so, jennifer. [laughter] >> please come up. (applause) >> this wouldedthctionv have happened without her. and phoenix is going to be 2013 or 2014 graffiti international. thank you, graffiti fighters. (applause)
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>> it's cocktail time. [laughter] ... (music) >> herb theatre,open rehearsal. listen to the rehearsal. i think it is fun for them, they see our work process, our discussions, the decisions we make. it is good for us. we kind of behavior little bit when we have people in the audience. msk
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(music) >> we are rehearsing for our most expensive tour; plus two concerts here. we are proud that the growth of the orchestra, and how it is expanded and it is being accepted. my ambition when i came on as music director here -- it was evident we needed absolutely excellent work. also evident to me that i thought everyone should know that. this was my purpose. and after we opened, which was a spectacular opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed
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slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage.
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we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you look at the first of the program you have very early, young vibrant mendelson; fabulous opener and then you have this fabulous concerto written for us in the orchestra. is our gift.
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msk(music) >> and then you have strauss, extraordinary piece. the most challenging of all. string orchestra work. 23 solo instrument, no violin section, now viola section; everybody is responsible for their part in this piece. the challenge is something that i felt not only that we could do , absolutely could do, but i wanted to show off. i can't tell you how aware i am of the audience. not only what i hear but their vibes, so strong. i have been doing this for a long time.
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i kind of make them feel what i want them to feel. there is nobody in that audience or anywhere that is not going to know that particular song by the fourth note. and that is our encore on tour. by the way. i am proud to play it, we are from san francisco. we are going to play that piece no matter where we are.
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>> you guys have some good lunch? always the worst to try to do a presentation after lung. : we'll try to make it through it. before we get started i'm supposed to make sure if you have a question, we have to use this microphone here. so, you have to wait till you get the microphone in front of you to ask a question he. * lunch that's the purpose for the audio and stuff. today we're going to talk about -- basically this is what i want to do here. i've been a detective for about six years now and been with the police department 15 years. prior to that i was in the united states army, military
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police corps. any [speaker not understood] here? just one? prior to that when i went to college i was always looking at graffiti. i'm originally from wisconsin and there's a lot of gang graffiti back when i was growing up. i was interested in looking at it and seeing the messages that were up there. when i got into the phoenix police department, i worked four years on the road and then i started doing school resource officer. the school resource officer for a couple years where i really, really learned about graffiti. in your presentation, it talked about how the schools, schools are big where they start out, okay. [speaker not understood] at home, but school is where they really get started. in the state of arizona if graffiti is done in school, a cemetery or church, it's an automatic class expeling. anybody here from arizona? where are you from? >> tucson. >> awesome. where are you from? >> i'm from [speaker not
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understood]. >> you work at the prison? >> [speaker not understood]. >> the jail, okay. are you guys law enforce. ment in here? any nonlaw enforcement in here? what you do? >> [speaker not understood]. >> sweet. >> [speaker not understood]. >> neighborhood revitalization. >> awesome. we work really, a lot hand in hand in the city of phoenix with our neighborhood services department. by far some of my best friends. we get a lot done. i can't speak enough about them. somebody asked me if [speaker not understood] can come in here. i want to try to keep the media out. i'll tell you guys about that in the future, how we don't really want these people to know, we don't want it out in the media, hey, we just busted somebody because we used facebook to get them. what are the vandals going to do?
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everything is going to go away. we want to make sure -- i'm telling you right now by no means am i an spederth. i will not stand up here and tell you i'm an expert on how to investigate graffiti. i am not an expert to tell you how to use technology. what i want to do with you is to show you what i have done that has been successful for me to get vandals arrested. and what we did is pretty good. we use a couple things. anybody ever heard of graffiti tracker? you haven't? awesome program, right. if you guys don't have graffiti tracker yet, we're going to talk about graffiti tracker. that's one of the biggest things i use. when i first came to this detail, i was a body hate crimes school violence detector when i first came to this detail. next thing they said, budget cuts. they got rid of school violence for some reason and then gave me graffiti. i was like, ah, hell no, graffiti? [laughter]
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>> hey, when you work the road, you get that hot call for graffiti. you guys are passionate because you're here obviously. most of the time i listen to the radio and they slow all that. you know what i'm saying? it's just graffiti, just a misdemeanor. but we talk about it, it's not just graffiti, it is a gateway crime. we're doing a study right now as we speak, we're into our second year showing that it's not just grab at&t other aloe, showing that their next step is burglary. with the use of facebook and the use of our program right here that we did just this past year, we helped with a homicide. we helped with a sexual assault. not a kid, but trigs went in and sexually assaulted the mom of a girl and they tagged their name on the wall. who did they come to first? us. who do you think this is? we told them. they went and sat on them, got all the evidence we needed, got a good arrest. so, it's not just graffiti. i keep telling the officers on
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the street, it is not just grab eat aloe. it leads to something else. we talk about the addictive behavior of graffiti. it really is addictive. everybody that i've interviewed so far, we're going to talk about some of those at the end, always tell me that they're addict today it, they can't stop. so, it is an addictive behavior. it is not about the actual graffiti that they're putting up. okay. it's that addiction to do it. so, what's next? after you do graffiti, why not burglarize a house? get another adrenaline rush, [speaker not understood]. some of the things we're going to talk about. if you have any questions again and you want to e-mail me anything that i present to you. i e-mailed a bunch of things in here to get out to you, but i guess they didn't get them printed out. i have a thing for facebook on how to obtain a search warrant or a subpoena from facebook. if you don't have that, yeah, that, there are some that don't have it. if you don't have it, e-mail me.
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i'll give you all that information. my card is over here on the table and i will get that to you. if you ever need help writing a search warrant, call me. i don't care, i'll help you out. if you ever need help writing a request for subpoena for records. and this is not just facebook. we don't have enough time to just talk about everything that we use. we do these on cell phones. i don't know, you guys know in arizona now if we arrest somebody doing graffiti and take their phone, we have to get a search warrant now to get what's on that phone. you can't just take it like i don't know what some of your jurisdictions allow you to do, but we cannot take that now. we used to be able to. we used to take it, go down and we scan that phone and get every single picture, every single video, every single contact off of it. now they just recently passed that law where we can't do that. we have to get a search warrant now. that's what we do. i can show you how to do a search warrant for that. if you ever need help with that, r just call me and ask. be more than happy to help you because the bottom line is what we're all here for. i'm very happy that this is being kicked offer.
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-- off. some of the importance of deal with graffiti, how to set up your own facebook account, using facebook to gather intel. facebook subpoenas, search warrant guidelines, and using grab at&t aloe tracker for investigations. then we're going to talk about if we have time, we'll talk about the successful investigations that we have done at the city of phoenix level. the importance of dealing with graffiti, graffiti gives your city a dirty appearance. residents become afraid. businesses may not want to locate to your city. and less businesses mean less jobs. we know how that's affecting a lot of us. why do we want to use social media to investigate? why are you guys here? >> [inaudible]. >> it is, everybody talks on facebook, right? i learned this way back when i was doing s-r-o.
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it was myspace back then. myspace was huge, right? everybody got on myspace and everybody talked. well, i was at the school doing that job, i could always get intel on the kids finding out when the parties were going to be, who was in the fight, a lot of them used their phone to tape the fight and put it on myspace. now we have youtube and facebook. so, there's a wealth of information on there, a lot for us to use. this came from a facebook spokesperson. we never turn over content records in response to u.s. legal process unless that process is a search warrant reviewed by a judge. we are required to regularly push back against over board requests. anybody ever sent in a subpoena to facebook yet? anybody ever ask facebook, hey, can we get the content of this? of this person's profile? if you ask right away, they're
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going to tell you, [speaker not understood]. so, you better bring it with a subpoena or a search warrant. it's better this way anyway because when you do get stuff on there, you know, it's better to present in court. how did you obtain it? i got on their facebook and i printed the screen. that's not going to work. it's better if you say, i subpoenaed or i sent a search warrant to facebook and this is what they provided me with. it's better in court when you get there. if users are concerned about law enforcement somehow getting hold of their information on facebook, then they probably shouldn't put any information online to begin with. anybody in here have a facebook account? afraid to admit it? [laughter] my sister is on facebook and she posts everything. when the baby forwards, when
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the baby poops, when the baby eats, when the baby sleeps. it's cool. * farts guess who else uses facebook? all these vandals. i'm going to show you pictures and actual footage from the facebook to show you what they put on here. i'll go back to telling you guys how we got started. when i did get the graffiti, i told you, crap, this sucks. i have to do grace feet aloe, have to try to find out what these trigs are all about. when i was in s-r-o it was easier to deal with it in the school because that was my own little community. i can handle a little around the community of the school to help get the tigers. * when i started doing the graffiti, i felt like i was just pushing paper every day. how many of you guys actually investigate graffiti in here? do you feel that way sometimes? you're just pushing misdemeanor
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paperwork, here we go, here we go, here we go. well, i got this graffiti tracker program and i started putting that together and i'm like, how can we use this? * to get something bigger? i sat down with our county attorney then, rick romly. i said, this is what i want to do. i wanted to compile everything that i can get off of facebook, everything that i can get off of the graffiti tracker program and try to nail the subject with the graffiti that they've done just by using those two things basically. let's try it. first guy we did was ultra here. he didn't have a lot. it was more for these slap tags. but he did about 125 incidences in the city of phoenix. not a big one, but it's just enough to start me out to try to get something. he was an adult and he served 36 days in jail doing city. i didn't get enough to get a felony count on that, but that
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was my first attempt at getting a felony. i heard some people in here, san francisco, $450 is the damage limit for a felony, 400? phoenix or arizona it's a thousand. okay. it used to be 250 years ago and they moved it up to a thousand. so, it's a little bit harder for us to get -- if i got him down to $97 0 in damage, i almost got him. [laughter] >> but this is the way we started, though. ultra was my very first big case instead of doing these little tagers every so often. you guys investigating graffiti crimes, you see a tager come across. once in a while, what the hell is this, ultra again? ultra again? * this is how we started. * tagger look at different things on facebook. i don't know if you guys can
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see all the paint cans. it's got a couple assault rifles in there. graffiti is just -- graffiti -- those guys aren't that bad. we're seeing a lot of -- in the state of -- in the city of phoenix, not the state of arizona, but the city of phoenix, we don't recognize tagging crews yet as gangses. they don't filth our criteria for dealing that. but if you look at it, they do. i can prove to you that it's the same stuff as when when you document a gang memorandum ben bernanketioner they're doing the same stuff. a lot these guys get jumped into a tagging crew. three ways to get into a tagging crew i know from speaking and interviewing all these guys. you either get jumped in, you get bombed in, which means they go around the city and bomb, or if you're a girl, you get sexed in. who does that, too? gangs. they do the same stuff. and we have a big ic

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